webTB.org  Home  Login/out  Consortium Info  Feedback  

News/Articles Feeds from BMC, Nature, Science


Back to TB Home

Deprecated: Function set_magic_quotes_runtime() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/zfeeder.php on line 60

Deprecated: Function split() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/zfeeder.php on line 92

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305
BMC Structural Biology - Latest Articles   [more] [xml]
 2014-11-05T12:00:00Z Structure and functional characterization of pyruvate decarboxylase from Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus
Background: Bacterial pyruvate decarboxylases (PDC) are rare. Their role in ethanol production and in bacterially mediated ethanologenic processes has, however, ensured a continued and growing interest. PDCs from Zymomonas mobilis (ZmPDC), Zymobacter palmae (ZpPDC) and Sarcina ventriculi (SvPDC) have been characterized and ZmPDC has been produced successfully in a range of heterologous hosts. PDCs from the Acetobacteraceae and their role in metabolism have not been characterized to the same extent. Examples include Gluconobacter oxydans (GoPDC), G. diazotrophicus (GdPDC) and Acetobacter pasteutrianus (ApPDC). All of these organisms are of commercial importance. Results: This study reports the kinetic characterization and the crystal structure of a PDC from Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus (GdPDC). Enzyme kinetic analysis indicates a high affinity for pyruvate (K M 0.06 mM at pH 5), high catalytic efficiencies (1.3 • 106 M−1•s−1 at pH 5), pHopt of 5.5 and Topt at 45°C. The enzyme is not thermostable (T½ of 18 minutes at 60°C) and the calculated number of bonds between monomers and dimers do not give clear indications for the relatively lower thermostability compared to other PDCs. The structure is highly similar to those described for Z. mobilis (ZmPDC) and A. pasteurianus PDC (ApPDC) with a rmsd value of 0.57 Å for Cα when comparing GdPDC to that of ApPDC. Indole-3-pyruvate does not serve as a substrate for the enzyme. Structural differences occur in two loci, involving the regions Thr341 to Thr352 and Asn499 to Asp503. Conclusions: This is the first study of the PDC from G. diazotrophicus (PAL5) and lays the groundwork for future research into its role in this endosymbiont. The crystal structure of GdPDC indicates the enzyme to be evolutionarily closely related to homologues from Z. mobilis and A. pasteurianus and suggests strong selective pressure to keep the enzyme characteristics in a narrow range. The pH optimum together with reduced thermostability likely reflect the host organisms niche and conditions under which these properties have been naturally selected for. The lack of activity on indole-3-pyruvate excludes this decarboxylase as the enzyme responsible for indole acetic acid production in G. diazotrophicus.
 2014-10-18T12:00:00Z A PDB-wide, evolution-based assessment of protein¿protein interfaces
Background: Thanks to the growth in sequence and structure databases, more than 50 million sequences are now available in UniProt and 100,000 structures in the PDB. Rich information about protein–protein interfaces can be obtained by a comprehensive study of protein contacts in the PDB, their sequence conservation and geometric features. Results: An automated computational pipeline was developed to run our Evolutionary Protein–Protein Interface Classifier (EPPIC) software on the entire PDB and store the results in a relational database, currently containing > 800,000 interfaces. This allows the analysis of interface data on a PDB-wide scale. Two large benchmark datasets of biological interfaces and crystal contacts, each containing about 3000 entries, were automatically generated based on criteria thought to be strong indicators of interface type. The BioMany set of biological interfaces includes NMR dimers solved as crystal structures and interfaces that are preserved across diverse crystal forms, as catalogued by the Protein Common Interface Database (ProtCID) from Xu and Dunbrack. The second dataset, XtalMany, is derived from interfaces that would lead to infinite assemblies and are therefore crystal contacts. BioMany and XtalMany were used to benchmark the EPPIC approach. The performance of EPPIC was also compared to classifications from the Protein Interfaces, Surfaces, and Assemblies (PISA) program on a PDB-wide scale, finding that the two approaches give the same call in about 88% of PDB interfaces. By comparing our safest predictions to the PDB author annotations, we provide a lower-bound estimate of the error rate of biological unit annotations in the PDB. Additionally, we developed a PyMOL plugin for direct download and easy visualization of EPPIC interfaces for any PDB entry. Both the datasets and the PyMOL plugin are available at http://www.eppic-web.org/ewui/\#downloads. Conclusions: Our computational pipeline allows us to analyze protein–protein contacts and their sequence conservation across the entire PDB. Two new benchmark datasets are provided, which are over an order of magnitude larger than existing manually curated ones. These tools enable the comprehensive study of several aspects of protein–protein contacts in the PDB and represent a basis for future, even larger scale studies of protein–protein interactions.
 2014-10-15T00:00:00Z Molecular dynamics simulations of the Nip7 proteins from the marine deep- and shallow-water Pyrococcus species
Background: The identification of the mechanisms of adaptation of protein structures to extreme environmental conditions is a challenging task of structural biology. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the Nip7 protein involved in RNA processing from the shallow-water (P. furiosus) and the deep-water (P. abyssi) marine hyperthermophylic archaea at different temperatures (300 and 373 K) and pressures (0.1, 50 and 100 MPa). The aim was to disclose similarities and differences between the deep- and shallow-sea protein models at different temperatures and pressures. Results: The current results demonstrate that the 3D models of the two proteins at all the examined values of pressures and temperatures are compact, stable and similar to the known crystal structure of the P. abyssi Nip7. The structural deviations and fluctuations in the polypeptide chain during the MD simulations were the most pronounced in the loop regions, their magnitude being larger for the C-terminal domain in both proteins. A number of highly mobile segments the protein globule presumably involved in protein-protein interactions were identified. Regions of the polypeptide chain with significant difference in conformational dynamics between the deep- and shallow-water proteins were identified. Conclusions: The results of our analysis demonstrated that in the examined ranges of temperatures and pressures, increase in temperature has a stronger effect on change in the dynamic properties of the protein globule than the increase in pressure. The conformational changes of both the deep- and shallow-sea protein models under increasing temperature and pressure are non-uniform. Our current results indicate that amino acid substitutions between shallow- and deep-water proteins only slightly affect overall stability of two proteins. Rather, they may affect the interactions of the Nip7 protein with its protein or RNA partners.
 2014-09-23T00:00:00Z Buried chloride stereochemistry in the Protein Data Bank
Background: Despite the chloride anion is involved in fundamental biological processes, its interactions with proteins are little known. In particular, we lack a systematic survey of its coordination spheres. Results: The analysis of a non-redundant set (pairwise sequence identity < 30%) of 1739 high resolution (<2 Å) crystal structures that contain at least one chloride anion shows that the first coordination spheres of the chlorides are essentially constituted by hydrogen bond donors. Amongst the side-chains positively charged, arginine interacts with chlorides much more frequently than lysine. Although the most common coordination number is 4, the coordination stereochemistry is closer to the expected geometry when the coordination number is 5, suggesting that this is the coordination number towards which the chlorides tend when they interact with proteins. Conclusions: The results of these analyses are useful in interpreting, describing, and validating new protein crystal structures that contain chloride anions.
 2014-09-17T12:00:00Z Structural insight into the recognition of amino-acylated initiator tRNA by eIF5B in the 80S initiation complex
Background: From bacteria to eukarya, the specific recognition of the amino-acylated initiator tRNA by the universally conserved translational GTPase eIF5B/IF2 is one of the most central interactions in the process of translation initiation. However, the molecular details, particularly also in the context of ribosomal initiation complexes, are only partially understood. Results: A reinterpretation of the 6.6 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the eukaryal 80S initiation complex using the recently published crystal structure of eIF5B reveals that domain IV of eIF5B forms extensive interaction interfaces with the Met-tRNAi, which, in contrast to the previous model, directly involve the methionylated 3′ CCA-end of the acceptor stem. These contacts are mediated by a conserved surface area, which is homologous to the surface areas mediating the interactions between IF2 and fMet-tRNAfMet as well as between domain II of EF-Tu and amino-acylated elongator tRNAs. Conclusions: The reported observations provide novel direct structural insight into the specific recognition of the methionylated acceptor stem by eIF5B domain IV and demonstrate its universality among eIF5B/IF2 orthologs in the three domains of life.
 2014-07-19T00:00:00Z A simple method for finding a protein¿s ligand-binding pockets
Background: This paper provides a simple and rapid method for a protein-clustering strategy. The basic idea implemented here is to use computational geometry methods to predict and characterize ligand-binding pockets of a given protein structure. In addition to geometrical characteristics of the protein structure, we consider some simple biochemical properties that help recognize the best candidates for pockets in a protein’s active site. Results: Our results are shown to produce good agreement with known empirical results. Conclusions: The method presented in this paper is a low-cost rapid computational method that could be used to classify proteins and other biomolecules, and furthermore could be useful in reducing the cost and time of drug discovery.
 2014-07-07T00:00:00Z Characterization of the SAM domain of the PKD-related protein ANKS6 and its interaction with ANKS3
Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder leading to end-stage renal failure in humans. In the PKD/Mhm(cy/+) rat model of ADPKD, the point mutation R823W in the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain of the protein ANKS6 is responsible for disease. SAM domains are known protein-protein interaction domains, capable of binding each other to form polymers and heterodimers. Despite its physiological importance, little is known about the function of ANKS6 and how the R823W point mutation leads to PKD. Recent work has revealed that ANKS6 interacts with a related protein called ANKS3. Both ANKS6 and ANKS3 have a similar domain structure, with ankyrin repeats at the N-terminus and a SAM domain at the C-terminus. Results: The SAM domain of ANKS3 is identified as a direct binding partner of the ANKS6 SAM domain. We find that ANKS3-SAM polymerizes and ANKS6-SAM can bind to one end of the polymer. We present crystal structures of both the ANKS3-SAM polymer and the ANKS3-SAM/ANKS6-SAM complex, revealing the molecular details of their association. We also learn how the R823W mutation disrupts ANKS6 function by dramatically destabilizing the SAM domain such that the interaction with ANKS3-SAM is lost. Conclusions: ANKS3 is a direct interacting partner of ANKS6. By structurally and biochemically characterizing the interaction between the ANKS3 and ANKS6 SAM domains, our work provides a basis for future investigation of how the interaction between these proteins mediates kidney function.
 2014-05-29T00:00:00Z High-resolution crystal structure of spin labelled (T21R1) azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a challenging structural benchmark for in silico spin labelling algorithms
Background: EPR-based distance measurements between spin labels in proteins have become a valuable tool in structural biology. The direct translation of the experimental distances into structural information is however often impaired by the intrinsic flexibility of the spin labelled side chains. Different algorithms exist that predict the approximate conformation of the spin label either by using pre-computed rotamer libraries of the labelled side chain (rotamer approach) or by simply determining its accessible volume (accessible volume approach). Surprisingly, comparisons with many experimental distances have shown that both approaches deliver the same distance prediction accuracy of about 3 Å. Results: Here, instead of comparing predicted and experimental distances, we test the ability of both approaches to predict the actual conformations of spin labels found in a new high-resolution crystal structure of spin labelled azurin (T21R1). Inside the crystal, the label is found in two very different environments which serve as a challenging test for the in silico approaches. Conclusions: Our results illustrate why simple and more sophisticated programs lead to the same prediciton error. Thus, a more precise treatment of the complete environment of the label and also its interactions with the environment will be needed to increase the accuracy of in silico spin labelling algorithms.
 2014-05-23T00:00:00Z Sequence analysis on the information of folding initiation segments in ferredoxin-like fold proteins
Background: While some studies have shown that the 3D protein structures are more conservative than their amino acid sequences, other experimental studies have shown that even if two proteins share the same topology, they may have different folding pathways. There are many studies investigating this issue with molecular dynamics or Go-like model simulations, however, one should be able to obtain the same information by analyzing the proteins’ amino acid sequences, if the sequences contain all the information about the 3D structures. In this study, we use information about protein sequences to predict the location of their folding segments. We focus on proteins with a ferredoxin-like fold, which has a characteristic topology. Some of these proteins have different folding segments. Results: Despite the simplicity of our methods, we are able to correctly determine the experimentally identified folding segments by predicting the location of the compact regions considered to play an important role in structural formation. We also apply our sequence analyses to some homologues of each protein and confirm that there are highly conserved folding segments despite the homologues’ sequence diversity. These homologues have similar folding segments even though the homology of two proteins’ sequences is not so high. Conclusion: Our analyses have proven useful for investigating the common or different folding features of the proteins studied.
 2014-04-24T00:00:00Z High resolution structure of cleaved Serpin 42 Da from Drosophila melanogaster
Background: The Drosophila melanogaster Serpin 42 Da gene (previously Serpin 4) encodes a serine protease inhibitor that is capable of remarkable functional diversity through the alternative splicing of four different reactive centre loop exons. Eight protein isoforms of Serpin 42 Da have been identified to date, targeting the protease inhibitor to both different proteases and cellular locations. Biochemical and genetic studies suggest that Serpin 42 Da inhibits target proteases through the classical serpin ‘suicide’ inhibition mechanism, however the crystal structure of a representative Serpin 42 Da isoform remains to be determined. Results: We report two high-resolution crystal structures of Serpin 42 Da representing the A/B isoforms in the cleaved conformation, belonging to two different space-groups and diffracting to 1.7 Å and 1.8 Å. Structural analysis reveals the archetypal serpin fold, with the major elements of secondary structure displaying significant homology to the vertebrate serpin, neuroserpin. Key residues known to have central roles in the serpin inhibitory mechanism are conserved in both the hinge and shutter regions of Serpin 42 Da. Furthermore, these structures identify important conserved interactions that appear to be of crucial importance in allowing the Serpin 42 Da fold to act as a versatile template for multiple reactive centre loops that have different sequences and protease specificities. Conclusions: In combination with previous biochemical and genetic studies, these structures confirm for the first time that the Serpin 42 Da isoforms are typical inhibitory serpin family members with the conserved serpin fold and inhibitory mechanism. Additionally, these data reveal the remarkable structural plasticity of serpins, whereby the basic fold is harnessed as a template for inhibition of a large spectrum of proteases by reactive centre loop exon ‘switching’. This is the first structure of a Drosophila serpin reported to date, and will provide a platform for future mutational studies in Drosophila to ascertain the functional role of each of the Serpin 42 Da isoforms.


Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305
BMC Bioinformatics - Latest Articles   [more] [xml]
 2014-11-21T00:00:00Z Computational approach for calculating the probability of eukaryotic translation initiation from ribo-seq data that takes into account leaky scanning
Background: Ribosome profiling (ribo-seq) provides experimental data on the density of elongating or initiating ribosomes at the whole transcriptome level that can be potentially used for estimating absolute levels of translation initiation at individual Translation Initiation Sites (TISs). These absolute levels depend on the mutual organisation of TISs within individual mRNAs. For example, according to the leaky scanning model of translation initiation in eukaryotes, a strong TIS downstream of another strong TIS is unlikely to be productive, since only a few scanning ribosomes would be able to reach the downstream TIS. In order to understand the dependence of translation initiation efficiency on the surrounding nucleotide context, it is important to estimate the strength of TISs independently of their mutual organisation, i.e. to estimate with what probability a ribosome would initiate at a particular TIS. Results: We designed a simple computational approach for estimating the probabilities of ribosomes initiating at individual start codons using ribosome profiling data. The method is based on the widely accepted leaky scanning model of translation initiation in eukaryotes which postulates that scanning ribosomes may skip a start codon if the initiation context is unfavourable and continue on scanning. We tested our approach on three independent ribo-seq datasets obtained in mammalian cultured cells. Conclusions: Our results suggested that the method successfully discriminates between weak and strong TISs and that the majority of numerous non-AUG TISs reported recently are very weak. Therefore the high frequency of non-AUG TISs observed in ribosome profiling experiments is due to their proximity to mRNA 5?-ends rather than their strength. Detectable translation initiation at non-AUG codons downstream of AUG codons is comparatively infrequent. The leaky scanning method will be useful for the characterization of differences in start codon selection between tissues, developmental stages and in response to stress conditions.


Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305
BMC Genomics - Latest Articles   [more] [xml]
 2014-11-23T00:00:00Z Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways
Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogenetically clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. Additionally, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. Conclusion: The bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their effects on degradation efficacy. Further, the diversity in the lin gene sequences and copy number, their arrangement with respect to IS6100 and evidence for potential plasmid content elucidate possible evolutionary acquisition mechanisms for this pathway. This study further opens the horizon for selection of bacterial strains for inclusion in an HCH bioremediation consortium and suggests that HDIPO4, IP26 and B90A would be appropriate candidates for inclusion.


Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305
BMC Biochemistry - Latest Articles   [more] [xml]
 2014-11-06T12:00:00Z Phosphorylation in intrinsically disordered regions regulates the activity of Neurogenin2
Background: Neuronal differentiation is largely under the control of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proneural transcription factors that play key roles during development of the embryonic nervous system. In addition to well-characterised regulation of their expression, increasing evidence is emerging for additional post-translational regulation of proneural protein activity. Of particular interest is the bHLH proneural factor Neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which orchestrates progression from neural progenitor to differentiated neuron in several regions of the central nervous system. Previous studies have demonstrated a key role for cell cycle-dependent multi-site phosphorylation of Ngn2 protein at Serine-Proline (SP) sites for regulation of its neuronal differentiation activity, although the potential structural and functional consequences of phosphorylation at different regions of the protein are unclear. Results: Here we characterise the role of phosphorylation of specific regions of Ngn2 on the stability of Ngn2 protein and on its neuronal differentiation activity in vivo in the developing embryo, demonstrating clearly that the location of SP sites is less important than the number of SP sites available for control of Ngn2 activity in vivo. We also provide structural evidence that Ngn2 contains large, intrinsically disordered regions that undergo phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Conclusions: Phosphorylation of Ngn2 occurs in both the N- and C-terminal regions, either side of the conserved basic Helix-Loop-Helix domain. While these phosphorylation events do not change the intrinsic stability of Ngn2, phosphorylation on multiple sites acts to limit its ability to drive neuronal differentiation in vivo. Phosphorylated regions of Ngn2 are predicted to be intrinsically disordered and cdk-dependent phosphorylation of these intrinsically disordered regions contributes to Ngn2 regulation.


Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305
Nature   [more] [xml]
 2005-01-19 Einstein is dead
Until its next revolution, much of the glory of physics will be in engineering. It is a shame that the physicists who do so much of it keep so quiet about it.

Einstein is dead

Nature 433, 179 (2005). doi:10.1038/433179a

Until its next revolution, much of the glory of physics will be in engineering. It is a shame that the physicists who do so much of it keep so quiet about it.



Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305

Deprecated: Function ereg_replace() is deprecated in /var/www/html/TB2/PUBLIC/RSS/newsfeeds/includes/zfuncs.php on line 305
Science: Current Issue   [more] [xml]
 2014-11-21 [Editorial] More Science in the Classroom
About a year ago, Bruce Alberts and I announced the launch of Science in the Classroom (scienceintheclassroom.org), an online resource of annotated research papers published in Science, with associated teaching materials designed to help pre-college and college students understand how science moves forward as a structured way of revealing the laws of nature. Since its fledgling beginning last year, the project has expanded its subject diversity and continues to add articles at the rate of two per month. These articles have reached about 3000 users per month. But now it is time to take this project to the next level—and you can help, by annotating new papers and designing creative activities to accompany them. Author: Marcia McNutt

powered by zFeeder